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COVID-19 CORONAVIRUS ALERTS ARCHIVE

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September 16, 2020

There are 666 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 25 deaths in Banning.

Washington and Oregon Join California in Pilot Project Using Google and Apple Exposure Notification Technology to Slow the Spread of COVID-19

Published:


Latest collaboration of the Western States Pact

Seal_of_the_Governor_of_CaliforniaSACRAMENTO — Governor Gavin Newsom today announced that Washington and Oregon, members of the Western States Pact, will participate with California in piloting a project to test promising exposure notification technology. These states join other members of the Western States Pact, Colorado and Nevada, along with states and universities across the country, in piloting this technology.

Announced Friday by the California Department of Public Health and the California Department of Technology, the pilot project will test the Exposure Notification Express mobile application pioneered by Google and Apple. The app confidentially notifies individuals who may have been exposed to someone who tested positive for the virus. Privacy and security are central to the design of the technology, which does not collect location data from any device and never shares user identities. Users must opt-in to the technology.

“Exposure notification technology has tremendous potential to slow the spread of COVID-19 within our communities and our region,” said Governor Gavin Newsom. “With the participation of the Western States Pact in this important endeavor, our public health officials and academic and technology partners can share experiences and lessons as they develop the Exposure Notification Express application. I thank my fellow governors for so many acts of collaboration and coordination during this crisis, and I look forward to our continued partnership in the fight against COVID-19.”

“Exposure notification is one of the most important things we can do in a pandemic. Getting this information to people who may have been exposed to COVID-19 helps them take the steps they need to stay healthy, and it helps their communities from potentially being further exposed,” said Washington Governor Jay Inslee. “In the absence of a strong national strategy to fight COVID-19, coordinated efforts between states on reining in this pandemic are critical. Washingtonians are grateful to have partners like Oregon and California in this fight.”

“Knowledge is power when it comes to stopping the spread of COVID-19, and this pilot project will help people make informed decisions to keep themselves healthy, while still protecting individual privacy,” said Oregon Governor Kate Brown. “COVID-19 knows no state borders, and my goal is to make sure, if more widely implemented, this exposure notification technology is made available to those communities that have been disproportionately impacted by this disease—Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Pacific Islander, and Tribal communities, as well as those living in the rural parts of our states.”

“This innovative solution will help us slow the spread of this deadly virus. We should use this tech to our advantage, and the more states and people that participate, the more we can detect and prevent potential hot spots and defeat the virus,” said Colorado Governor Jared Polis. “This new tool will allow Coloradans to voluntarily participate in saving lives and staying safe while protecting their privacy and safety.”

“The Nevada COVID Trace app launched in late August to great success and is one more way technology can help provide valuable, safe, and secure information to Nevadans and our visitors about their potential exposure to COVID-19,” said Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak. “We know that there is strength in numbers, and I am so glad to work with the leaders from the rest of the Western States Pact in these important efforts to help keep all of our residents safe and healthy.”

Since the earliest days of the pandemic, the Western States Pact has collaborated to protect health and safety and slow the spread of COVID-19. In April, states in the Pact announced they would be working together under a shared vision for gradually modifying their states’ stay-at-home orders and fighting COVID-19. California also worked with Washington and Oregon to share best practices on how our states can allow hospitals and medical providers to resume delayed medical care in areas that have sufficient hospital capacity, while ensuring the safety and health of our health care workers and patients. Additionally, through the Western States Pact, governors and legislative leaders from five western states requested $1 trillion in direct and flexible relief to states and local governments to preserve core government services like public health, public safety and public education, and help people get back to work.


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For Immediate Release:
Media Contact: Rob Moran, Business & Community Services
rmoran@rivco.org
(951) 955-6673

Third round of business assistance grant applications to open Sept. 16 with expanded eligibility

Two other small business programs launched to help local businesses with reopening

rivcobuscomOn Wednesday (Sept. 16), the third round of applications for the business assistance grant will open and run through October 30, or until funds are exhausted. Expanded eligibility in round three includes recipients of Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans of $75,000 and under.

Over $30million has been awarded to more than 3,000 Riverside County small businessesthrough the COVID19 business assistance grant program. The program was approved by the County of Riverside Board of Supervisors June 2 using $45 million in Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES) grant funding to aid small businesses enduring hardships due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Eligible businesses for the business assistance grant include private for-profit businesses that have experienced a financial hardship as a result of COVID-19, businesses with less than 50 employees, and those operating for a minimum of one year as of March 1, 2020. Sole proprietors and businesses that received the SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) or advance are also eligible.

In addition, the County of Riverside launched the Business Ambassador Program to help businesses in readiness and reopening efforts. Through the program, a business ambassador will conduct an individualized in-person, virtual, or telephone consultation at no cost to identify ways businesses can operate safely and within compliance of state and local reopening guidelines.

During the visit, businesses are provided a toolkit which includes state industry guidance and checklists, protocols for when employees test positive for COVID-19, face masks, mask compliance posters and other resource information. Businesses are also encouraged to take the Greater Together, Safer Together pledge to demonstrate to their customers and employees their commitment to safe and healthy operating practices. To date, 75 businesses have been visited by the ambassador program and 413 businesses have taken the Greater Together, Safer Together pledge.

Coachella Valley Small Business Development Center (CVSBDC), hosted by Riverside County Business & Community Services, is an SBA, GO-Biz and Riverside County funded small business assistance centerproviding technical assistance and training to businesses to assist them to launch and grow. Consultants provide oneon-one consultation and training at no-cost to businesses and individuals wanting to start a business.

Coachella Valley Small Business Development Center’s economic impact and capital infusion for the first six months of 2020 include: 2,305 hours of consulting to 1,000 clients, assistance to 309 clients with nearly $42.7 million in capital funding and supporting 6,312 jobs. The negative economic impacts due to COVID-19 have required an aggressive response to assist the many local businesses that were affected. In comparison, during the first six months of 2019, consulting hours were 58% less than 2020, while capital infusion in 2019 was less than $1 million.

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September 3, 2020

There are 635 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 19 deaths in Banning.

Riverside County
NEWS RELEASE
Contact:
Riverside County Joint Information Center
951-955-5087 

Continue coronavirus safety measures during holiday weekend

25085323910_8e252f43c3_mRiverside County health officials are urging residents to remember the safety measures to prevent the spread of coronavirus as they celebrate the Labor Day weekend. 

Officials say they are concerned there could be a surge in COVID-19 cases similar those which occurred following the Memorial Day and Fourth of July weekends earlier during the pandemic. After increases in July and August, data related to the spread of coronavirus has improved over the last few weeks. The number of those hospitalized with COVID-19 has dropped, along with ICU cases. The positivity rate in Riverside County inching closer to the state-required 8 percent or less.

“Through hard work and the sacrifice of residents, Riverside County has seen improvements in the numbers indicating the spread of coronavirus has slowed,” said Kim Saruwatari, director of the Riverside University Health System - Public Health. “It would be a shame for the results of that hard work to be lost because of the holiday.” 

Health officials have always encouraged residents to follow several safety tips, including wearing a face mask, practice social distancing and frequent hand washing. Additionally, officials have urged residents to avoid crowds when out in public and not to attend social gatherings. 

“There is a temptation during the holiday to attend parties or gatherings and people forget about virus spread,” Saruwatari said. “These parties among family and friends are places where the disease spreads.”

For the latest news and safety tips, click www.rivcoph.org/coronavirus.

“On behalf of the County of Riverside, I wish our residents and families a safe and happy Labor Day,” said Riverside County Board Chair and Fourth District Supervisor V. Manuel Perez. “Let’s have a wonderful Labor Day weekend and keep ourselves and all the individuals who are out there working safe.”


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August 26, 2020

There are 618 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 19 deaths in Banning.

Governor Newsom Signs Executive Order on Elections


Seal_of_the_Governor_of_CaliforniaSACRAMENTO – Governor Gavin Newsom today signed an executive order to assist elections officials as they prepare for the upcoming election amid the COVID-19 pandemic and wildfires across the state.

The order extends the deadline for county elections officials to count and verify signatures submitted for initiative petitions seeking to qualify for the November 2022 ballot, giving the elections officials needed flexibility to focus on preparations for the General Election this November.

Today’s order builds on the Administration’s ongoing work with the Legislature, the Secretary of State and county elections officials to ensure that Californians can exercise their right to vote in a safe, secure and accessible manner, including legislation establishing special procedures for the upcoming election, and ensuring that all Californians registered to vote are mailed a ballot.

The text of the Governor’s executive order can be found here and a copy can be found here.


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Governor Newsom Announces Major Plan
to More than Double State’s Testing Capacity,
Reduce Turnaround Time


Contract with diagnostics company will allow California to process up to an additional 150,000 COVID-19 tests a day with a contractual turnaround time of 24-48 hours

Groundbreaking deal will disrupt testing market and drive down cost of tests for everyone; it expands California’s ability to fight COVID-19 and protect essential workers and those most at risk of infection


Seal_of_the_Governor_of_CaliforniaSACRAMENTO — Governor Gavin Newsom today announced that California has signed a groundbreaking contract with a major diagnostics company, which will allow California to process up to an additional 150,000 COVID-19 diagnostic tests a day, with a contractual turnaround time of 24-48 hours. The goal is to stand up a laboratory facility and begin processing tens of thousands of additional tests by November 1 and run at full capacity by ­no later than March 1, 2021.

This first-of-its-kind agreement aims to disrupt the testing marketplace, help break supply chain logjams and drive down the costs for tests for every Californian. It will greatly expand California’s ability to track and prevent COVID-19 infections across the state and create additional testing capacity that will allow the state to increase testing in communities at high risk for contracting COVID-19, like essential workers, those in congregate settings and communities of color.

“California is using its market power to combat global supply chain challenges and protect Californians in the fight against COVID-19. Supply chains across the country have slowed as demand for COVID-19 tests has increased, and flu season will only exacerbate the problem,” said Governor Newsom. “So we are building our own laboratory capabilities right here on California soil with a stable supply chain to fight the disease, lower the prices of testing for everyone and protect Californians most at risk from COVID-19.”

Under the contract with PerkinElmer, the state will utilize polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnostic testing, which is considered to be the gold standard in testing. The state continues to evaluate new technological breakthroughs in testing, which is why this contract includes provisions that enable the contractor to adopt new technology at a lower price point. Additionally, the state plans to leverage multiple technologies or modalities with multiple laboratory partners to ensure that we diversify our testing capabilities.

The per-test cost would be $30.78 at 150,000 tests per day. For context, Medicare and Medicaid both reimburse at roughly $100 per test, while the average cost of a COVID-19 test ranges from $150 – $200 per test. To support this contract at the lowest cost to taxpayers, the state will enter into a contract for third-party billing services to recoup costs from health insurance companies or other payers.

“Californians need testing that is accessible, equitable, cost-effective and timely,” said Senate Budget Chair Senator Holly Mitchell. “This deal meets all those metrics.”

“Our Latino community is disproportionately devastated by this public health crisis. Latinos perform the essential work in our agricultural fields, our garment factories and our meatpacking plants that increase their chances of contracting COVID-19 and put their lives at risk,” said California Latino Legislative Caucus Chair Assemblymember Lorena Gonzalez. “Expanding testing for all Californians means that our essential workers will have more access to information to protect themselves, their families and their communities.”

“Black Californians have been disproportionately sickened and killed by COVID-19,” said California Legislative Black Caucus Chair Assemblymember Shirley Weber. “I am pleased that Governor Newsom is prioritizing more testing equity for all Californians.”

Senate Health Committee Chair Senator Richard Pan and Assembly Health Committee Chair Assemblymember Jim Wood also joined the Governor during today’s announcement and voiced their support for the plan.

“Physicians have been on the front lines of this pandemic from Day One. To provide the best care possible to our patients we need fast, reliable diagnostic testing,” said Peter N. Bretan, Jr., M.D., President of the California Medical Association. “We applaud Governor Newsom for helping us address that need. Rapid testing also increases our ability to do effective contact tracing to help stem the spread of COVID-19.”

“Every Californian, regardless of age, race, income or immigration status, needs rapid and reliable results for testing for COVID-19, if we are to ultimately contain this coronavirus,” said Anthony Wright, Executive Director of Health Access California. “Californians will benefit from us having this increased capacity for COVID-19 testing, at a set and affordable price.”


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Contact:
Riverside County Joint Information Center
(951) 955-5087
Public contact: 2-1-1


Supervisors approve $4 million for Pathways to Employment program



Riverside County SealA $4 million program to assist unemployed residents get work training and mentoring received unanimous support from the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday. Riverside County’s Pathways to Employment program will provide adult participants paid stipends and other supportive services to ensure success.
The county’s Housing, Homelessness Prevention and Workforce Solutions (HHPWS) director will oversee the program and work closely with the Community Action Partnership, a national network designated to battle poverty.

“We initially had public safety in mind for this program, including additional support for the Riverside County Fire Department’s reserve program,” said First District Supervisor Kevin Jeffries. “Then we were able to expand the program to several other areas including nonprofits and government agencies. The important thing is people will get valuable work experience that we hope will encourage new careers.”

Almost 15 percent of Riverside County’s workforce of more than 1 million remains unemployed and there are few options for returning to work soon, said HHPWS Director Heidi Marshall.

“Many residents are experiencing devasting financial losses as a result of furloughs and layoffs,” Marshall said. “Low-income residents and those with little to no financial cushion were heavily affected and forced to rely on social service providers for basic necessities, such as food and housing.”

The Board of Supervisors approved using CARES Act federal funding for the Pathways to Employment program. The CARES Act provided local governments critical funding as a result of the coronavirus pandemic’s impact on economies and employment.

Pathways to Employment will recruit 500 adults who have been impacted by COVID-19 and participants will receive the following: a living wage stipend of $20 per hour; training and mentoring from nonprofit and government partners; supportive services, including transportation, clothing, counseling and technological assistance.

The program will launch in September and will be administered by the Community Action Partnership. For more information, please call the Housing, Homelessness Prevention and Workforce Solutions department at (951) 955-1161.


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August 25, 2020

There are 615 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 19 deaths in Banning.

Governor Newsom Signs Executive Order in Response to COVID-19 8.24.20


SACRAMENTO — Governor Gavin Newsom today issued an executive order to help increase the availability of CLIA-waived COVID-19 testing and address a variety of issues in response to the pandemic.

The order allows the California Department of Consumer Affairs, in consultation with the California Department of Public Health, to issue waivers permitting pharmacists and pharmacy technicians to conduct CLIA-waived COVID-19 tests, which detect the presence of the virus.

The order also enables certain adoption paperwork to be completed remotely, and for birth parents known or suspected to be COVID-19 positive, waives the requirement that relinquishment for adoption and other acts related to the process occur in-person.

The order increases the income-eligibility threshold for the Community Service Block Grant program to support economic and community development efforts in response to the pandemic, and waives certain requirements under state law so that additional Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program funding made available under the CARES Act can be used to maximize direct assistance to Californians most in need.

In addition, the order waives a time limit to allow individuals to continue receiving California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) benefits; permits the Franchise Tax Board to share tax return information with the Department of Social Services, to inform individuals of CARES Act “Recovery Rebates” available to them; and increases the health care capacity of home health agencies and pediatric day health and respite care facilities.

The text of the Governor’s executive order can be found here and a copy can be found here.

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Contact: Riverside County Joint Information Center
(951) 955-5087
Public contact: 2-1-1


Supervisors approve $4 million for Pathways to Employment program



Riverside County SealA $4 million program to assist unemployed residents get work training and mentoring received unanimous support from the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday. Riverside County’s Pathways to Employment program will provide adult participants paid stipends and other supportive services to ensure success.
The county’s Housing, Homelessness Prevention and Workforce Solutions (HHPWS) director will oversee the program and work closely with the Community Action Partnership, a national network designated to battle poverty.

“We initially had public safety in mind for this program, including additional support for the Riverside County Fire Department’s reserve program,” said First District Supervisor Kevin Jeffries. “Then we were able to expand the program to several other areas including nonprofits and government agencies. The important thing is people will get valuable work experience that we hope will encourage new careers.”

Almost 15 percent of Riverside County’s workforce of more than 1 million remains unemployed and there are few options for returning to work soon, said HHPWS Director Heidi Marshall.

“Many residents are experiencing devasting financial losses as a result of furloughs and layoffs,” Marshall said. “Low-income residents and those with little to no financial cushion were heavily affected and forced to rely on social service providers for basic necessities, such as food and housing.”

The Board of Supervisors approved using CARES Act federal funding for the Pathways to Employment program. The CARES Act provided local governments critical funding as a result of the coronavirus pandemic’s impact on economies and employment.

Pathways to Employment will recruit 500 adults who have been impacted by COVID-19 and participants will receive the following: a living wage stipend of $20 per hour; training and mentoring from nonprofit and government partners; supportive services, including transportation, clothing, counseling and technological assistance.

The program will launch in September and will be administered by the Community Action Partnership. For more information, please call the Housing, Homelessness Prevention and Workforce Solutions department at (951) 955-1161.


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August 24, 2020

There are 606 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 19 deaths in Banning.

NEWS RELEASE Riverside County
Contact: Joint Information Center: 951-955-5087
(Monday through Friday during business hours)

Riverside County elementary schools can apply for waiver
starting Monday to hold in-person classes

Riverside County SealElementary schools in Riverside County seeking to open for in-person teaching can apply for a waiver starting Monday, county officials have announced. According to state guidelines, waivers can only be approved for grades ranging from transitional kindergarten through sixth grade.

Schools, both public and private, can obtain a waiver application on the RUHS-Public Health website or by clicking here.

No in-person education has been allowed to take place in Riverside County for months following an order by Gov. Gavin Newsom in the wake of the spread of coronavirus.

“The biggest predictor of school spread is community spread, and although we’re still finding new cases of COVID-19, our case rate has dropped enough where we can consider elementary school waivers,” said Dr. Cameron Kaiser, Riverside County public health officer. “However, the waiver process won’t be a rubber stamp, and elementary schools will be required to publicly demonstrate they have the pieces in place to operate safely or they won’t be approved. We want exposures to be rare and, should an exposure occur, for the school to show they can handle it without putting others at risk.”

The state's threshold for schools to apply for waivers allowing for in-person instruction is 200 cases per 100,000 residents. Riverside County is currently at 170 cases per 100,000 residents. This is a daily calculation on the state's monitoring list. Riverside County officials have been monitoring the per-case levels and will start accepting waiver applications Monday.

The waiver application will be reviewed by Dr. Cameron Kaiser, Riverside County public health officer. Waivers are necessary because Riverside County is currently on the state’s watch list. The county must be off the watch list for 14 days before schools and school districts may reopen without a waiver.

“Adapting to virtual learning has been a challenge for everyone, and I applaud all the teachers, parents and students for their continued commitment to education during this pandemic” said Vice Chair Karen Spiegel, Second District Supervisor. “Now that we’re meeting state metrics, the schools and districts that wish to apply for in-person instruction now have the opportunity to do so, while ensuring proper safeguards for the children and staff.”



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August 13, 2020

There are 530 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 15 deaths in Banning.

Governor Newsom Provides Update on California’s COVID-19 Response and Action to Support Economic Recovery

SACRAMENTO – Governor Gavin Newsom today provided an update on the state’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic and outlined proposals to stabilize California’s economy, businesses and workforce, aid workers and employers, and create equitable growth across the state’s economy.

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August 11, 2020

There are 513 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 14 deaths in Banning.

Why it is important to wear a mask

CDC logoMasks may help prevent people who have COVID-19 from spreading the virus to others. Wearing a mask will help protect people around you, including those at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19 and workers who frequently come into close contact with other people (e.g., in stores and restaurants). Masks are most likely to reduce the spread of COVID-19 when they are widely used by people in public settings. The spread of COVID-19 can be reduced when masks are used along with other preventive measures, including social distancing, frequent handwashing, and cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces.

The masks recommended here are not surgical masks or respirators. Currently, those are critical supplies that should be reserved for healthcare workers and other first responders. Masks are not personal protective equipment (PPE). They are not appropriate substitutes for PPE such as respirators (like N95 respirators) or medical facemasks (like surgical masks) in workplaces where respirators or facemasks are recommended or required to protect the wearer.

Masks with Exhalation Valves or Vents

The purpose of masks is to keep respiratory droplets from reaching others to aid with source control. Masks with one-way valves or vents allow exhaled air to be expelled out through holes in the material.  This can allow exhaled respiratory droplets to reach others and potentially spread the COVID-19 virus. Therefore, CDC does not recommend using masks if they have an exhalation valve or vent.



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August 6, 2020

There are 462 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 13 deaths in Banning.

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Media contact:
Riverside County Joint Information Center 951-955-5087
Public contact: 2-1-1

Public health officer issues statement on school waiver process

Riverside County SealRiverside County Public Health Officer Dr. Cameron Kaiser issued a memorandum to officials of public and private elementary schools in Riverside County today. The memo addresses that while the state provided guidance for the school waiver process earlier this week, Riverside County does not currently meet the state’s threshold to begin accepting waivers.

The memo provides information, guidance and the process for leaders at local elementary schools regarding the waiver process available for transitional-kindergarten (TK) through sixthgrade education in counties on the statewide COVID-19 monitoring list.

Dr. Kaiser’s memo (attached) also advises that the county Public Health Department may choose a phased-in approach with a selection of schools per supervisorial district in order to evaluate risk and probability of outbreak, rather than opening all applicants at once. This, he wrote, will be based on the number of applications received and in which regions.


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August 5, 2020

There are 454 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 12 deaths in Banning.

UPDATED ADVISORY FOR THE OPERATION OF YOUTH SPORTS

To Whom It May Concern:

Riverside County SealPlease be advised that on August 3, 2020, the California Department of Public Heath (CDPH) issued new Interim Guidance as related to Youth Sports. A copy of this Interim Guidance can be found here: https://files.covid19.ca.gov/pdf/guidance-youth-sports--en.pdf. Additionally on August 3, 2020, CDPH issued the “Youth Sports Questions and Answers” memorandum. A copy of this Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) document can be found here: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/Pages/COVID-19/Youth-Sports-FAQ.aspx

Pursuant to CDPH’s Interim Guidance and FAQ’s, beginning July 30, 2020, CDPH is allowing youth sports and physical education ONLY when the following can be maintained: (1) physical distancing of at least six (6) feet between participants; and (2) a stable cohort, such as a class, that limits the risk of transmission (see the CDC Guidance on Schools and Cohorting available here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/schools-childcare/prepare-safereturn.html#cohorting). For sports that cannot be played with sufficient distancing or cohorting, only physical conditioning and training is permitted and ONLY where physical distancing can be maintained. Conditioning and training should focus on individual skill building (e.g., running drills and body weight resistance training). Sports that cannot be played with sufficient distancing and cohorting are not permitted. 

Please note that the August 3, 2020 Interim Guidance and FAQ’s impacts all youth sports and activities, including school-based, club and recreational youth sports, including but not limited to football, basketball, volleyball, hockey, softball, baseball, soccer, swim, water polo, gymnastics, cheer, dance, and karate. 

By way of background, Governor Gavin Newsom’s Executive Order N-22-30, dated March 19, 2020, orders all persons to stay at home to protect the health and well-being of all Californians and to establish consistency across the state in order to slow the spread of COVID-19. This Order encompasses the Order of the State Public Health Officer, also dated March 19, 2020, which states in relevant part: “To protect public health, I as State Public Health Officer and Director of the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) order all individuals living in the State of California to stay at home or at their place of residence except as needed to maintain continuity of operations of the federal critical infrastructure sectors…” A copy of this Executive Order and the Order of the State Public Health Officer can be found online at: https://covid19.ca.gov/img/Executive-Order-N-33-20.pdf

In addition, on March 22, 2020, the State Public Health Officer designated a list of “‘Essential Critical Infrastructure Workers’ to help state, local, tribal, and industry partners as they work to protect communities, while ensuring the continuity of functions critical to public health and safety, as well as economic and national security.” A copy of the State Public Health Officer’s “Essential Critical Infrastructure Workers” list, as updated on July 27, 2020, can be found here: https://covid19.ca.gov/essentialworkforce/#:~:text=The%20Critical%20Manufacturing%20Sector%20identifies,manufacturing %20industries%20are%20essential%20to

The State then set out California's path forward from this "Stay-at-Home" Order in California's Pandemic Resilience Roadmap. That Road map identifies four stages of the pandemic: safety and preparation (Stage 1); reopening of lower-risk workplaces and other spaces (Stage 2); reopening of higher-risk workplaces and other spaces (Stage 3); and finally, an easing of final restrictions leading to the end of the Stay-at-Home Order (Stage 4). https://www.gov.ca.gov/wpcontent/uploads/2020/04/Update-on-California-Pandemic-Roadmap.pdf

On May 7, 2020, it was announced that statewide data supported the gradual movement of the entire state of California into Stage 2 of the Pandemic Resilience Road Map. On May 22, 2020, the County of Riverside was permitted to move forward into the State’s “accelerated Stage 2” of the Pandemic Resilience Roadmap.

On July 1, 2020, CDPH issued “Guidance on Closure of Sectors in Response to COVID-19” to 19 counties on the County Monitoring List, including Riverside County. A copy of this Guidance can be found here: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/Pages/COVID-19/Guidance-on-Closure-ofSectors-in-Response-to-COVID-19.aspx

On July 2, 2020, Dr. Sonia Y. Angell, CDPH Director and State Health Officer, issued an Order specific to Riverside County which restricted the operations of various sectors after the “current data reflect that community spread of infection is of increasing concern across the state, and most particularly in those counties on the County Monitoring List” like Riverside County. This Order remains in effect today and will be applicable until otherwise directed by Dr. Angell. A copy of this Order can be found here: https://rivcoph.org/Portals/0/Documents/CoronaVirus/July/GovernorOrders/Order_Closing_Indo or_Services_and_Sectors-Riverside.pdf?ver=2020-07-02-132939- 667×tamp=1593721789591

Most recently, on July 13, 2020, Dr. Angell expanded statewide the indoor closures for businesses that encourage mixing of individuals beyond immediate households and make physical distancing and wearing face coverings difficult. The Order also provides that for counties on the County Monitoring List, including the County of Riverside, “the risks and impacts of disease transmission are even greater”. Therefore, the Order also required the immediate closure of indoor operations of additional businesses, events and activities in counties listed on the State’s monitoring List. Pursuant to this Order, the indoor operation of gyms and fitness centers is not currently permitted in the County of Riverside. Once again, this Order remains in effect today and will be applicable until otherwise directed by Dr. Angell. A copy of this Order can be found here: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/CDPH%20Document%20Library/COVID19/SHO%20Order%20Dimming%20Entire%20State%207-13-2020.pdf.

As a result of the July 13, 2020 Order closing the indoor operation of gyms and fitness centers in the County of Riverside, please be advised that any and all youth sports and physical education programs within the County must take place outdoors until otherwise advised by the State Health Officer.

Again, pursuant to CDPH’s Interim Guidance and FAQ’s, youth sports and physical education may ONLY occur when both physical distancing of at least six (6) feet between participants and a stable cohort can be maintained. In addition, outdoor and indoor sporting events, assemblies, and other activities that require close contact or that promote congregating are not permitted at this time. As such, tournaments, events, or competitions, regardless of whether teams are from the same school or from different schools, counties, or states are not permitted at this time and should be cancelled or continued.

Should you have any questions, please contact Kirsten Shea, Deputy County Counsel, at kshea@rivco.org. Your cooperation and assistance is greatly appreciated. Sincerely, Gregory P. Priamos GREGORY P. PRIAMOS County Counsel


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August 4, 2020

There are 451 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 11 deaths in Banning.

Media Contact:
Riverside County Joint Information Center 951-955-5087
Public contact: 2-1-1


Board of Supervisors vote 5-0 to declare racism as a public health crisis

Board also unanimously approves listening sessions on county services and budget


Riverside County SealRiverside County Board of Supervisors unanimously agreed Tuesday (Aug. 4) that racism is a public health crisis and vowed to take steps to deal with the issue.

The 5-0 vote took place after supervisors heard from several community members who supported the resolution, which indicated that “systemic racism causes persistent racial discrimination in housing, education, employment, transportation, and criminal justice.”

“America is blessed with incredible diversity that makes us unique and is one of our strengths. But systemic racism in our country continues to limit opportunities for communities of color in ways that damage physical and mental health even across generations,” said Supervisor Chuck Washington, Third District. “The time to address health disparities is long overdue.”

Among the planned actions in the resolution, supervisors agreed to seek more diversity in the county’s workforce and in leadership positions; implement solutions to eliminate systemic inequality in all external services provided by the county; and enhance public education to increase understanding and awareness of systemic inequality and its impact.

“This action reaffirms our commitment to address the health disparities among communities of color,” said Kim Saruwatari, director or Riverside University Healthy System - Public Health. “Systemic racism impacts communities at so many levels and the effects can be devastating.”

The board also voted 5-0 in a separate agenda item to hold workshops, including listening sessions with the community and meetings among the board and county department heads. The workshops will focus on county services and budget priorities, including public safety, behavioral health and social services.

“In the spirit of civil rights giant, Congressman John Lewis, I am proud of today’s historical vote within Riverside County to advance social justice, equity and community empowerment,” said Riverside County Board Chair and Fourth District Supervisor V. Manuel Perez. “Today, we passed two major efforts to fight racism and have listening sessions to look at how we fund and re-fund safety net services and meet the social needs of our communities.”


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Media Contact:
Riverside County Joint Information Center 951-955-5087
Public contact: 2-1-1

$2 Million Approved to Launch Youth Community Corps

Program gives young people an opportunity to participate in local service program supporting COVID-19 community response


Riverside County SealThe Riverside County Board of Supervisors unanimously approved a program today that will recruit youngsters to help support the community response to the deadly pandemic.

The $2 million federally funded program will provide each participant with a paid stipend, training and mentorship during their term.

Launching the Youth Community Corps is part of the county’s overall battle to save lives from COVID-19 – and provide job opportunities to one of the age groups hardest hit with unemployment.

“In addition to receiving immediate economic support, participants will acquire resumebuilding skills and make crucial connections,” said Heidi Marshall, director of Housing, Homeless Solutions, the county department overseeing the Youth Community Corps. “The participants will get job experience and should pick up key resume-building skills for future jobs, such as empathy and critical thinking.”

The county’s Youth Opportunity Center system and Youth Advisory Council will help launch the corps and further partnerships with community-based organizations and cities will build momentum. An important part of the project is the support provided to local nonprofits, assisting local food pantries, school lunch programs and helping municipal social service departments.

“We can’t forget how hard this pandemic is hitting our young people,” said Riverside County Supervisor Chuck Washington, Third District. “There have been so many job opportunities lost, internships canceled and college experiences shifted online. This is our way to offer financial assistance – and more importantly, hope – to our young people.”

Civic engagement opportunities provide that hope, Marshall said. The participants will be contributing to a community working together to overcome economic adversity and protecting the most vulnerable, she said.

Additionally, a large-scale marketing campaign will attempt to draw youth from all cities and those living in unincorporated county areas. The program is geared to reach a wide net of young people accessing the program.

The program is open to county residents 16- to 24-years-old. For more information and to apply, please visit www.RivCoWorkforce.com or email youthcorps@rivco.org for questions.


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August 3, 2020

There are 446 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 11 deaths in Banning.

Aug. 3, 2020
Media Contact:
Riverside County Joint Information Center 951-955-5087
Public contact: 2-1-1

State fixing technical issue causing lag in case reporting

Delay may give impression Riverside County cases are slowing down; not the case, say local health experts


Riverside County SealRiverside County health officials urge the public to stay vigilant in protecting themselves from the coronavirus, despite an appearance the disease is slowing locally.There is currently a technical issue with the California Department of Public Health’s electronic disease reporting system. The California Reportable Disease Information Exchange (commonly called CalREDIE) is experiencing delays.

Electronic laboratory reporting is not being submitted to CalREDIE’s system in a real-time manner. Riverside County’s positive cases in recent days may appear that the numbers are holding steady or flattening, but that’s simply not true, said Public Health Director Kim Saruwatari.

“This is an integration, technical issue,” Saruwatari said. “Simply put, there is a significant lag in how the information is being fed into the system. We’re anticipating significant increases in case reporting this week.”

This is why Saruwatari and the county’s Public Health Officer Dr. Cameron Kaiser said it’s as important as ever for residents to battle the virus in every way possible. Embracing the county’s new campaign – Masks are Medicine – is one way to do that, Dr. Kaiser said.

“Practicing social distancing, washing one’s hands routinely and wearing face coverings are critical steps to protecting yourself and your friends and loved ones,” Dr. Kaiser said. “We did it before and we can do it again.”

The California Department of Public Health informed public health departments of the delay in an e-mail on Friday (Aug. 1). Today, the CDPH informed local agencies that it is committed to resolving the issue as quickly as possible and has “urgently escalated this issue to leadership.”

Saruwatari said the delay impacts how public health workers can chase down cases for investigation, contact tracing and, ultimately, controlling the disease. The county’s testing positivity rate is also impacted by the delay.

Hospitalization and death rates are not impacted as they are reported directly to the county through different systems. A total of 737 residents have succumbed to COVID-19 and roughly 425 residents are currently being cared for in Riverside County hospitals. More than 38,000 have tested positive for the virus.

“We’re hopeful this technical issue will be resolved quickly so we can continue our fight to protect our county residents,” Saruwatari said.


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